Getting to the “Personal” in Personal Branding

Don’t Forget About the “Here and Now”

WOW! The 2016-17 bar year has come to an end just as quickly as it started!

We began the bar year with board and member retreats in our summer best and will be ending the year with our annual installation ceremony of our new officers this Thursday.  From launching the Inaugural Resident Blogger Program to hosting our own virtual 5K, GWAC has attempted to provide quality programming and resources to our members throughout the 2016-17 bar year.

As Public Relations Chair for GWAC, I am always thinking of new ways to promote the next GWAC event.  This idea of “next” can infiltrate different parts of our lives.  How are you going to get the next promotion, that next job, that next volunteer opportunity?  If you are anything like me, focusing on the “next” endeavor can divert your attention from the task that you are currently confronting.  What about this current position, this current job, this current volunteer opportunity?

Thus, I wanted to end the getting to the “personal” of personal branding blog on a simple note: while it is important to set goals, do not forget to complete the tasks that are before you now.  Your personal brand is what others think of you when you are not in room.  Do you want to be known as the person that submits incomplete work, the person that does not put forth their best effort, or the person that is involved in so many activities that you are not really good at anything?  Of course not!  Therefore, before networking your way to your next position, make sure you are doing your absolute best in the position you are in — so you can be ready for the responsibilities that come with that next position, that next job, that next volunteer opportunity.

I hope you have a safe, joyous, and prosperous summer!

What is the Solution?

What is the Solution?

(Originally posted at http://www.melaniebates.net/blog/what-is-the-solution)

African Americans are racially profiled and discriminated against consistently by law enforcement, due to implicit bias stemming from the horrendous history of this nation. I am outraged that yet again another police officer has been acquitted for murdering one of our people. I am sick and tired of this cycle repeating itself over and over without requiring accountability and transparency on the part of our government, which is paid by our tax dollars to protect and serve.

“I feared for my life.” These five words are regularly used by police officers as a defense. Fear is defined as “an unpleasant emotion caused by the belief that someone or something is dangerous, likely to cause pain, or a threat.” The countless police killings in recent years prove that the law does not protect African Americans. These instances are teaching us that if you are African American, you are a threat and therefore free game to be killed. The reality is, African Americans are the ones who are in constant fear for their lives. For example, if I am driving and see a police officer behind me, my stomach flips. I get nervous and shaky. I am worried that I will be pulled over for no valid reason and endure unnecessary emotional stress during the encounter. It does not matter that I am an attorney and know my rights. All it comes down to is that I am African American and perceived as dangerous.

When I was learning to drive, the first thing my mother told me was if I ever got pulled over, to keep my hands on the steering wheel at “10 and 2” where the officer could see them. If I did not have a chance to get my license and registration out prior to the officer coming to my window, I was to ask for permission to remove it from the glove compartment. I am certain my friends in white households were not taught the same.

I refuse to sit idle and watch another tragic incident occur. We must demand change. We cannot stop fighting until we see measurable impact. If transformation will not come from our elected officials and others in power, we must serve as the influencing voice to advocate for justice. But what is the solution?

Melanie Bates is an attorney based in Washington, D.C. She is on the Advisory Board of Free Minds Books Club and Writing Workshop, a nonprofit organization that uses books, creative writing, and peer support to awaken D.C. youth incarcerated as adults to develop their own potential. The views expressed here are her own.

Law & Well Being

Making a Case for Downtime

By Denise A. Robinson

Want to be more productive? Take a break.

As discussed in the first blog in this series, our American culture drives us to do first, be later. And the legal profession and client-service fields like it take that mantra to that next level. We are rewarded for pushing through, working all the time, and dropping everything when the client calls. But this approach means that we’re fighting a losing battle with our ability to focus, according to the research of Daniel Levitin and other neuroscientists.

While we are trained to think that if we just keep at it, we’ll get the work done, the fact is that our brain cells fatigue like any other cell in the body. To keep them fresh, we need to regularly allow the attentional filter in our brains called the insula, to move from tasks that require focus and concentration to those that don’t. These attention states are known as task positive and task negative, respectively. Taking a break from work is a way to get to the task negative state, but some of the common things we do when we think we’re taking a break won’t get us there. Consider the last time you were working and stopped to do something else. If that something else included checking your email or reading the news online, your brain treats that just like working from an attentional standpoint. It may feel like a break to you, but those activities compete for the focus and concentration needed for work tasks.

No wonder we’re so tired!

In addition to getting proper rest, something as simple as taking a brief walk outdoors or even around the office can reset your brain and provide you greater attentional resources when you return to tasks requiring focus. Recreational activities have a similar effect, as do hobbies such as gardening, painting, or making crafts. Listening to music or getting lost in a good novel works as well.

Taking vacations where you’re truly unplugged counts, too, but don’t wait for your next trip to give yourself a break. Make time for downtime every day.

How do you hold DC police accountable? Here’s how I learned.

How do you hold DC police accountable? Here’s how I learned.

(Originally posted on http://www.melaniebates.net/blog.html)

By GWAC Past President Melanie E. Bates

“Mere access to the courthouse doors does not by itself assure a proper functioning of the adversary process.” This profound quote by Thurgood Marshall succinctly illustrates the importance of knowing your rights when encountering the justice system, especially if you are African American. It is undisputed that African Americans are racially profiled and discriminated against consistently by law enforcement, due to implicit bias stemming from the horrendous history of this nation.

African Americans are pulled over by police, searched, and arrested at tremendously higher rates than whites. In Washington, D.C., between 2009 and 2011, more than 8 out of 10 residents arrested were African American. The inmate population at the D.C. jail is 89.1% African American, but African Americans only make up 48.3% of the city’s population! These figures are shocking and demonstrate how African Americans must always be prepared to demand equal treatment under the law. Unfortunately, I recently found myself in a situation where I would need to do so.

A few months ago, my friends and I were passengers in my friend’s vehicle, a newer model Maserati, when we were pulled over by D.C. police for no apparent reason. We were followed by this officer for at least .25 miles prior to being stopped. We were told the reason for the stop was due to a call about a woman in distress. The officer also stated that my friend failed to use his turn signal. Both of these statements appeared to be unfounded. After the officer collected my friend’s license and registration and returned to the vehicle, he stated that sometimes foxes are mistaken for a woman’s scream. He then issued a warning for failure to signal. My friends and I were outraged. The stop seemed to be an obvious act of racial profiling and a clear abuse of discretion. We were four young African Americans in a luxury vehicle, driving in an upper class neighborhood in the early morning hours. I shudder to imagine how this incident would have ended had my friend not indicated he lived in the neighborhood.

Fortunately, the District of Columbia established a mechanism for residents to hold law enforcement accountable. The agency was opened in 2001 and is called the Office of Police Complaints (OPC). The stated mission of OPC is to increase community trust in the District of Columbia police forces by providing a fair, thorough, and independent system of civilian oversight of law enforcement. Residents can file complaints against the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department and D.C. Housing Authority Office of Public Safety within 90 days of an incident. Since OPC opened, it has received approximately 15,830 total contacts with potential complainants and has handled 6,968 formal complaints.

I submitted my complaint to OPC via the online form. A few weeks later, I was interviewed by an OPC investigator. My case was then referred to mediation. In mediation, the mediator guides you and the officer through a dialogue about the incident that led to the complaint with the goal of reaching a common understanding. My mediation went surprisingly well. The officer was very cordial. He provided an extensive history of his background and thought process for the stop. He said hindsight is 20/20 and described what he would have done differently. He was clearly briefed and his statements seemed a bit rehearsed, but I think he was genuinely concerned and empathetic about my frustrations as an African American woman in America. The officer’s body worn camera footage did not capture the alleged failure to signal so it was essentially his word against mine. In the end, I agreed to resolve the complaint. It was a transformative learning experience. I was able to hear directly from the officer about his perspective of the incident and he was able to identify what he could have done differently, hopefully leading him to make better choices in the future.

I strongly encourage all residents to take advantage of the services OPC has to offer. While it can be an extensive process, the results are invaluable. You will feel empowered and motivated to help others fight for their rights. We must come together and join forces to hold our government accountable to its citizens. Our collective action will effectuate movement towards a more fair and balanced justice system.

Melanie Bates is an attorney based in Washington, D.C. She is on the Advisory Board of Free Minds Books Club and Writing Workshop, a nonprofit organization that uses books, creative writing, and peer support to awaken D.C. youth incarcerated as adults to develop their own potential. The views expressed here are her own.